The beautiful Nizo S 800 Braun Super 8 Camera designed by Dieter Rams in 1970.
The beautiful Nizo S 800 Braun Super 8 Camera designed by Dieter Rams in 1970.

No. 8
Good design is thorough down to the last detail,
Dieter Rams

Posted by Daniel Lignini,

Nothing must be arbitrary or left to chance. Care and accuracy in the design process show respect towards the consumer.

I’ve been thinking a lot about what it would be the right image for Rams’ 8th principle. In fact, Rams has never left anything to chance. It’s surprising how most of Rams’ products still seem fresh, like they were created just yesterday. It was hard but, I finally picked one:

Braun’s Nizo Super-8 camera designed by Dieter Rams and manufactured during the early 1970s.

Its design is still current, the technology, unfortunately not but nevertheless, it is a great example for this principle. Braun’s Nizo is one of the best super8 cameras ever built.

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Nizo S 800 Braun Super 8 Camera.
It represented the revolution of ‘home movie’ not just for its technology quality but for its ergonomically design, aesthetically and functionally appealing camera. The camera was designed with the consumer in mind and this —in addition to its technological quality merged with excellent design, was the key of its success.

Many of today’s great cinematographers and directors began their careers decades ago, at the counter of their local photo shop, buying a cartridge of Super 8 film.

Modern design seems focused on gimmicks and a “disposable” mentality, which explains why most of the products go out of style in less than a year. At the same time, it’s our fault as consumers, always waiting for the latest, better gadget.

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Nizo S 800 Braun Super 8 Camera.


Braun’s Nizo is one of the best super8 cameras ever built.

However, on the other hand, products like Apple’s make a conspicuous use of Rams’ principles and, even though the technology constantly evolves and every year there’s to be a new gadget, they are the opposite to “disposable.” The fulfillment of the modernist dream of good design for the masses (though Braun, like Apple, was never cheap).

Even Jonathan Ive, the father of Apple’s smooth, white, simplified, intuitive products admits that Rams was there first:

“What Dieter Rams and his team at Braun did was to produce…products that were beautifully made in high volumes and that were broadly accessible. He defined how it was supposed to be: how industry could responsibly bring useful, well-considered products to many.” Ive gets at the crux of Rams’ importance with his emphasis on the result: “When you think of Braun, you immediately think of the products, not some abstract mission statement or charter.”

Dieter Rams: Ten Principles for Good Design

Source:
The Architects NewspaperVitsœ
Photos:
VernissageTV Didier Leroi

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